Ten Big Self Publishing Lessons from SPP 1.0 (Self Publishing Podcast #168)

Released On: July 29, 2015

Ten Big Self Publishing Lessons from SPP 1.0 (Self Publishing Podcast #168)

After 167 episodes, Johnny Sean and Dave talk about what they’ve learned from three years of writing, interviewing and recording the Self Publishing Podcast. Today’s special episode includes:

  • The value of talking things out with others.
  • Branching away from Amazon
  • The Benefit of community
  • Understanding the importance of a list
  • The Value of haters — Katt Williams Haters gonna hate
  • Nurturing your list and letting your list nurture you
  • Audiobooks
  • The US and the UK isn’t the world
  • Diversification
  • Patience
  • Ends v. Means

Join the Conversation!

  • I’ve been following you guys since I started self-publishing back in 2011/2012. While I haven’t always agreed with everything you’ve said and what has worked for you hasn’t always worked for me, I cannot deny that I’ve gotten a lot of solid value from following your journey.

    On diversification: I’ve also found that my iBooks and Kobo sales are rising to catch up with Amazon, though my Nook sales have fallen. Back in 2012 there were months where my BN sales exceeded Amazon, but these days it’s barely a footnote.

    I will say that since a lot of authors have left Select due to Amazon’s changes, my ‘Zon sales have increased, while BN’s sales have dropped further.

    On expanding beyond self-publishing: I’ve co-founded a production company this year. While we’re planning to eventually expand into web-series, our first project is an audio drama serial anthology podcast. Our first serial is an adaptation of the next book I’m publishing, which works out into an 11-part story. I’m very excited about this as an alternative to audiobooks, though the adaptation process is as extensive as a full revision pass, given the differences in the needs of prose and audio.

    If you want to pursue these side-projects, the biggest hurdle is just working up the momentum to do it. Take a course in film production. Make some industry contacts by doing some networking. Partner up with people who know what they’re doing. Make mad films.

    All you need is a ready made audience willing to give your work a chance.